All posts by Robert Richardson

Congratulations to Juliet Schor for 2011 Herman Daly Award

The Board of the U.S. Society for Ecological Economics is pleased to announce the recipient of the 2011 Herman Daly Award—Dr. Juliet Schor of Boston College, whose pioneering research has challenged long-held theories and assumptions about work, leisure, consumerism, and economic justice. Congratulations, Professor Schor! This award is given in honor of Herman Daly, one of the visionaries who founded the field of ecological economics. The award is designed to recognize individuals who have connected ecological economic thinking to practical applications and implementation of solutions that are sustainable in scale, equitable in distribution and efficient in allocation. The award is given in conjunction with the biennial conference, to be held June 26-29, 2011 at Michigan State University in East Lansing (USSEE 2011 conference).

Juliet Schor is Professor of Sociology at Boston College. Her research focuses on issues pertaining to trends in work and leisure, consumerism, the relationship between work and family, women’s issues and economic justice. Schor’s latest book is Born to Buy: The Commercialized Child and the New Consumer Culture. She is also author of The Overworked American: The Unexpected Decline of Leisure and The Overspent American: Upscaling, Downshifting and the New Consumer.

Dr. Juliet Schor is the 2011 recipient of the Herman Daly Award

Schor’s research has challenged long-held assumptions and raised the kind of thought-provoking questions that are consistent with the aims of ecological economists. This has been especially true for her research on work, leisure, and consumption. In The Overworked American, she took a critical look at the impact of so-called time-saving and efficiency-increasing practices and technology. The best-selling book was chosen for the Princeton University Library’s Noteworthy Books in Industrial Relations and Labor Economics, it was cited as one of the best business books of 1992 Business Week, and the New York Times listed it among its notable books in 1992 and 1993.

Schor is a founding member and Secretary of the Board of Directors of the Center for a New American Dream, a non-profit organization committed to challenging the idea that “more stuff makes us happier.” She is also a Founding Member and Staff Economist of the Center for Popular Economics, a non-profit collective of political economists that offers workshops and institutes that simplify economics and put useful economic tools in the hands of people fighting for social and economic justice and against systems of oppression based on race, class, gender, nation and ethnicity.

In 2007 Schor was named the Friedson Lecturer in Sociology at New York University, and in 2006 she received the Leontief Prize for Expanding the Frontiers of Economic Thought from the Global Development and Environment Institute at Tufts University. She also holds a chair in the Economics of Leisure Studies at Tilburg University in the Netherlands. Schor is a graduate of Wesleyan University, and she received her Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Massachusetts. Before joining Boston College, Schor taught at Harvard University for 17 years, in the Department of Economics and in Women’s Studies.

USSEE 2011 conference registration is open

Registration for the 2011 conference of the U.S. Society for Ecological Economics is now open. The conference will be held at Michigan State University in East Lansing, Michigan, June 26-29, 2011, and the conference theme is “Building a Green Economy,” Keynote speakers for the conference include Dr. Larry Walker (Cornell University), Dr. David Korten (author, lecturer), Dr. Eban Goodstein (Bard College), Mr. Dave Dempsey (International Joint Commission), Dr. Kristen Sheeran (Economics for Equity and the Environment Network [E3]), and Dr. Bobbi Low (University of Michigan).

We invite you to register for the conference at the Conference Registration web page. Take advantage of lower rates by registering early; these rates are in effect through May 15. Information about the venue, travel, and hotel accommodations can be found on the Conference Venue web page.

Please share this information widely with colleagues and other interested parties. We look forward to seeing you at Michigan State University in June!

Job Opening: Assistant Professor of Ecological Economics at Northern Illinois University

The Institute for the Study of the Environment, Sustainability, and Energy at Northern Illinois University (NIU) and the Environmental Science Division at Argonne invite applications for an anticipated joint, tenure-track position at the rank of Assistant Professor to begin August 16, 2011.

We seek a candidate with teaching and empirical research interests in ecological economics (macro and micro), ideally with additional experience in related subjects such as sustainability science, political economy, economic geography, or other fields related to environmental policy and management. It is expected that this faculty member will apply modeling approaches to assess the balances and tradeoffs among the human economy and the economy of nature, such as ecological footprint analysis, macroeconomic capacity assessment, ecosystem services evaluation, input-output analysis, spatial econometrics, or climate change impact assessment. This person will work closely in a multidisciplinary academic environment and an off-campus research environment.

A Ph.D. in a relevant discipline is required at the time of appointment. The successful candidate will have choice of tenure home in Economics, Geography, Political Science or another applicable department. The position is part of the new, interdisciplinary Institute for the Study for the Environment, Sustainability, and Energy at Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL.

More information about current faculty research interests and the Institute is available at http://www.niu.edu/ese/.

Applicants must electronically submit a letter of application, CV, statements of teaching and research interests, and three letters of references addressed to:

Dr. Carl von Ende,

Environmental Faculty Search Committee Chair,

at webmail: envs11econ@niu.edu.

Complete applications must be received by Feb 15, 2011.

NIU and Argonne are AA/EEO Institutions that value diversity in their faculty, staff, and student bodies; thus we strongly encourage applications from diverse candidates, including women and minorities

USSEE 2011 is now accepting abstracts

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS

USSEE 2011: Building a Green Economy
June 26-29, 2011, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, USA

Dear colleague:

The Board of the United States Society for Ecological Economics (USSEE) cordially invites you to submit an abstract for an individual poster, paper presentation, or complete session proposal to our 6th biennial conference, entitled “Building a Green Economy.” The conference will be held at Michigan State University in East Lansing, Michigan, June 26-29, 2011 (see https://www.msu.edu/~ussee).

USSEE 2011 is now accepting abstracts. Abstracts (200 words maximum) for sessions, individual papers, workshops, or other contributions should be submitted online via the Abstract Submission Form before the deadline date of January 31, 2011. For details, please see the Call for Abstracts and the list of Conference Themes, or visit the conference website. We extend a particular welcome to submissions of papers, posters, and session proposals related to the conference theme, “Building a Green Economy.”

Please share this information widely with colleagues and other interested parties. We look forward to seeing you in East Lansing in 2011!

With kind regards, on behalf of the conference committee,

Robert Richardson, USSEE 2011 Conference chairperson

2011 Conference: Building a Green Economy
Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan
June 26-29, 2011
https://www.msu.edu/~ussee
http://www.ussee.org
ussee@msu.edu

Call for Abstracts for USSEE 2011: Building a green economy

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS

USSEE 2011: Building a Green Economy
June 26-29, 2011, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, USA

Dear colleague:

The Board of the United States Society for Ecological Economics (USSEE) cordially invites you to submit an abstract for an individual poster, paper presentation, or complete session proposal to our 6th biennial conference, entitled “Building a Green Economy.” The conference will be held at Michigan State University in East Lansing, Michigan, June 26-29, 2011 (see https://www.msu.edu/~ussee).

Abstracts (200 words maximum) for sessions, individual papers, workshops, or other contributions should be submitted online via the Abstract Submission Form, between December 1, 2010 and the deadline date of January 31, 2011.

For details, please see the Call for Abstracts and the list of Conference Themes, or visit the conference website. We extend a particular welcome to submissions of papers, posters, and session proposals related to the conference theme, “Building a Green Economy.”

Please share this information widely with colleagues and other interested parties. We look forward to seeing you in East Lansing in 2011!

With kind regards, on behalf of the conference committee,

Robert Richardson, USSEE 2011 Conference chairperson
Michigan State University
East Lansing, MI 48824-1222
e-mail: ussee@msu.edu
tel: (517)-355-9533

2011 Conference: Building a Green Economy
Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan
June 26-29, 2011
https://www.msu.edu/~ussee
http://www.ussee.org
ussee@msu.edu

USSEE President Jon Erickson Discusses Ecological Economics at Michigan State University

GreenBoard: Looking at economics as part of the ecosystem
Thursday, October 21st, 2010 | Author: pacheco

Declining world oil supply, widening income gaps and over-exploitation of global fisheries were just some of the bad news Jon Erickson delivered in his talk at MSU this past Monday. But Erickson’s lecture, “An Ecological Economics for the Century of the Environment,” wasn’t actually about an impending doomsday. Erickson, who is a professor and managing director with the Gund Institute for Ecological Economics at the University of Vermont, emphasized how ecological economics can help save the planet. He also announced an opportunity for the MSU community to become involved in this discussion.

Studying economics through an ecological perspective is a return to amore holistic look at economic development where an economy’s sustainability is considered in relation to the dependent ecosystem. This means a forest is valued not just for its timber, but for all its ecosystem services, such as carbon storage, recreation, and pollination.

Erickson is critical of theories that characterize the economy as a closed system in which goods and services are simply exchanged between producers and consumers. For Erickson, these theories are insufficient because they do not consider the economy’s dependence on the environment as a source of raw materials and as a sink for pollution. “Where’s the environment and where’s the waste,” he asks.

Ecological economics understands the economic system as embedded within the ecosystem. In a world where natural resources like oil and water are only becoming scarcer, such a new, integrated perspective is necessary, says Erickson. He calls for a transdisciplinary approach. “Problems don’t sit neatly in disciplinary boxes,” he said. This type of economics challenges an idea fundamental to traditional economics: individuals are rational, isolated and self-serving beings. Erickson asked: “Who are we and where are we headed?” “Do we care about the future? About each other? Do we care what other people think?”

USSEE logoWhile these questions may seem more related to philosophy than economics, Erickson is confident in this new approach. As president of the U.S. Society of Ecological Economics (USSEE), he will be leading a larger discussion of this topic at MSU on June 26-29, 2011 when the USSEE hosts its sixth annual biennial conference, “Building a Green Economy,” in East Lansing.

“Michigan was chosen as the conference site because it is a kind of backdrop to the national dialog on the need for transition to a new economy that is not only environmentally sustainable, but…also socially just and equitable,” said Robby Richardson, an assistant professor in the Department of Community Agriculture, Recreation and Resource Studies and an ESPP affiliate.

Richardson is the conference chairperson and arranged for Erickson to speak. “The MSU community is already engaged in the design and delivery of curricula, research, and outreach programs that are interdisciplinary and innovative, and I am delighted that we are able to host this conference at MSU,” he said.

Interested in attending, presenting or contributing a paper? For more information on the conference, visit http://www.ussee.org/, and with any questions contact Richardson (rbr@msu.edu or 517-355-9533)

Written by Liz Pacheco (pachec18@msu.edu), News Writer for Environmental Science and Policy Program.