Category Archives: Education & Publications

New book on “Planning for Balance”

Planning for Balance: Making a Choice for a Safer Future, explores social choices that can help us create a safer future. It offers a program for deliberate economic, social and technological planning that respects natural balance. Planning in this sense is not intrusive, or “human centered”, but rather in harmony with the goal of preserving all life on earth. The ideas here support a workable survival economics that can help us achieve a better world.

Mark Jablonowski is an independent researcher who has spent the last 30 years studying and managing risk. He holds B.A. and M.A. degrees in Economics from the University of Hartford, (West Hartford, Connecticut, USA), where he has also served as an adjunct faculty member. Mr. Jablonowski is currently Director of naturalrisk.org.

EE study highlighted in Chemical & Engineering News

A study published in Ecological Economics by Christopher Weber and Scott Matthews of Carnegie Mellon University was highlighted in an Oct. 8th story on “Taking Freight Off the Road” published in the online Chemical & Engineering News.  The story focuses on the opportunity to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by shifting more freight transportation to water and rail, citing the 2008 EE article as:

A 2008 study published in Ecological Economics estimated that nearly a third of the greenhouse gases created by U.S. household consumption are emitted outside the country.

To read the full story, go to: http://pubs.acs.org/cen/news/88/i41/8841notw10.html.

Tim Jackson’s Economic Reality Check

As the world faces recession, climate change, inequity and more, Tim Jackson delivers a piercing challenge to established economic principles, explaining how we might stop feeding the crises and start investing in our future. Check out this latest TED talk grounded in the principles of ecological economics.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NZsp_EdO2Xk&fs=1&hl=en_US]

To learn more, check out Tim’s recent book Prosperity Without Growth.

Daniel Pink on the Surprising Science of Motivation

Career analyst Dan Pink examines the puzzle of motivation, starting with a fact that social scientists know but most managers don’t: Traditional rewards aren’t always as effective as we think. Listen for illuminating stories — and maybe, a way forward.  Check out this TED talk with much relevance to ecological economics.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rrkrvAUbU9Y&fs=1&hl=en_US]

New Teaching Module on Gulf Oil Spill

The Global Development and Environment Institute at Tufts University recently completed a new teaching module on The Gulf Oil Spill: Economics and Policy Issues.  From their web site:

The Deepwater Horizon oil spill in Summer 2010 has been called the worst environmental disaster in U.S. history. The Gulf spill raises numerous questions about energy, economics, and the environment. This module considers various aspects of the spill, including its economic impacts, its implications for offshore oil development, and its lessons for national and global energy policy. The methods for estimating the economic damages from oil spills are described, along with preliminary estimates of the spill’s impacts. The module discusses policy making in presence of low-probability high-impact outcomes. The true cost of our dependence on oil is considered. Finally, the module describes various policy options for reducing our dependence on oil.

The student reading consists of 38 pages which includes discussion questions, glossary, references, and web links.  For more information on this and other teaching modules related to ecological economics, visit the Institute’s web site at: http://ase.tufts.edu/gdae/.

Most cited and downloaded EE articles in last 5 years

From Elsevier’s web page for the journal Ecological Economics.

Top 10 Cited (articles published in the last five years)
Extracted from Scopus (on Sat Oct 2 20:48:23 BST 2010)

357 Update on the environmental and economic costs associated with alien-invasive species in the United States
Volume 52, Issue 3 SPEC. ISS., 2005, Pp 273-288
Pimentel, D. | Zuniga, R. | Morrison, D.
64 Allocating ecological footprints to final consumption categories with input-output analysis
Volume 56, Issue 1, 2006, Pp 28-48
Wiedmann, T. | Minx, J. | Barrett, J. | Wackernagel, M.
63 Spatial scales, stakeholders and the valuation of ecosystem services
Volume 57, Issue 2, 2006, Pp 209-228
Hein, L. | van Koppen, K. | de Groot, R.S. | van Ierland, E.C.
60 Examining the global environmental impact of regional consumption activities – Part 2: Review of input-output models for the assessment of environmental impacts embodied in trade
Volume 61, Issue 1, 2007, Pp 15-26
Wiedmann, T. | Lenzen, M. | Turner, K. | Barrett, J.
54 What are ecosystem services? The need for standardized environmental accounting units
Volume 63, Issue 2-3, 2007, Pp 616-626
Boyd, J. | Banzhaf, S.
54 A tale of two market failures: Technology and environmental policy
Volume 54, Issue 2-3, 2005, Pp 164-174
Jaffe, A.B. | Newell, R.G. | Stavins, R.N.
53 Designing payments for environmental services in theory and practice: An overview of the issues
Volume 65, Issue 4, 2008, Pp 663-674
Engel, S. | Pagiola, S. | Wunder, S.
47 An adaptive learning process for developing and applying sustainability indicators with local communities
Volume 59, Issue 4, 2006, Pp 406-418
Reed, M.S. | Fraser, E.D.G. | Dougill, A.J.
47 Foundations of transdisciplinarity
Volume 53, Issue 1, 2005, Pp 5-16
Max-Neef, M.A.
44 Intergenerational discounting: A new intuitive approach
Volume 52, Issue 2, 2005, Pp 135-142
Sumaila, U.R. | Walters, C.

Top 10 Downloaded

Extracted from 
Sat Oct 2 20:48:20 BST 2010

  1. The history of ecosystem services in economic theory and practice: From early notions to markets and payment schemes
    Ecological Economics, Volume 69, Issue 6, April 2010, Pages 1209-1218
  2. Update on the environmental and economic costs associated with alien-invasive species in the United States
    Ecological Economics, Volume 52, Issue 3, February 2005, Pages 273-288
  3. A typology for the classification, description and valuation of ecosystem functions, goods and services
    Ecological Economics, Volume 41, Issue 3, June 2002, Pages 393 – 408
  4. Reconciling theory and practice: An alternative conceptual framework for understanding payments for environmental services
    Ecological Economics, Volume 69, Issue 6, April 2010, Pages 1202-1208
  5. Ecosystem services: From eye-opening metaphor to complexity blinder
    Ecological Economics, Volume 69, Issue 6, April 2010, Pages 1219-1227
  6. An institutional analysis of payments for environmental services
    Ecological Economics, Volume 69, Issue 6, April 2010, Pages 1245-1252
  7. Designing payments for environmental services in theory and practice: An overview of the issues
    Ecological Economics, Volume 65, Issue 4, May 2008, Pages 663-674
  8. Payments for ecosystem services as commodity fetishism
    Ecological Economics, Volume 69, Issue 6, April 2010, Pages 1228-1236
  9. Ecosystem services in urban areas
    Ecological Economics, Volume 29, Issue 2, May 1999, Pages 293-301
  10. Economic and ecological concepts for valuing ecosystem services
    Ecological Economics, Volume 41, Issue 3, June 2002, Pages 375 – 392

EE Video – “What’s the Economy for Anyway?”

Don’t miss What’s the Economy for Anyway?, a film created and narrated by David Batker, Director of Earth Economics and Fellow at the Gund Institute for Ecological Economics.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gqiu7rzkxiE&fs=1&hl=en_US]

The film raises a question that is rarely ever asked, and yet is vitally important to our entire species. What IS the economy for? Is is to help the smallest number of people amass the largest amount of wealth? Is it for the greater good? Is it to create total balance and equity for all? Mr. Batker gets the viewers attention by sharing some very startling facts, such as the fact that the United States of America is the ONLY Western country that does not have a law guaranteeing paid vacation time.