Category Archives: News & Events

USSEE Webinar Series: Ostrom, Commons, and Voluntary Environmental Programs

Wednesday April 15th, 1pm EDT


Erik Nordman will apply concepts from Elinor Ostrom’s work on managing the commons to analyze the 2030 District Energy Program

to Registerhttps://www.eventbrite.com/e/ussee-webinar-series-ostrom-commons-and-voluntary-environmental-programs-tickets-101819123740

About this Event

Twenty cities (including Grand Rapids, Ann Arbor, and Detroit) have established 2030 District Energy Programs. Building owners within the districts voluntarily pledge to reduce their building energy use, water use and transportation-related greenhouse gases by 50% by 2030. The question is, can a voluntary program result in real resource use and pollution reductions? If so, how can the members hold each other accountable? Aseem Prakash, a student of Elinor Ostrom, and Matthew Potoski extended Ostrom’s ideas about managing a commons to voluntary environmental programs. The 2030 District program is evaluated using their “club theory” of voluntary environmental programs.

Erik Nordman is an associate professor of natural resources management at Grand Valley State University in Michigan. He teaches courses and conducts research in natural resource policy and environmental economics. He is on sabbatical as a visiting scholar at Indiana University’s Ostrom Workshop and is the author of a forthcoming book about Elinor Ostrom, to be published by Island Press.

For those that can not attend the live webinar, a recording will be made available on the USSEE webinar page after the event

Anthropocene to the Ecozoic webinar this Wednesday, 12 noon EDT

This Wednesday, March 25th at 12 noon EDT is the next webinar in the series “From the Anthropocene to the Ecozoic”.  The last Wednesday of every month we’ll be highlighting the work of graduate students, faculty, and collaborators in the Economics for the Anthropocene (E4A) and Leadership for the Ecozoic (L4E) graduate research and training partnerships. 

The term “Anthropocene” is used by geologists to distinguish our current reality of a human-dominated geological epoch.  The “Ecozoic” is an aspirational term coined by the eco-theologian Thomas Berry as a call for a new era of mutually beneficial relations between humans and all of life.  In this monthly series we’ll discuss the research and action that could inspire, enable, and co-create a flourishing Earth community. 

This week’s talks highlight food systems research, including:

  • “Food that’s Not for Sale” by Sam Bliss, UVM Rubenstein School Ph.D. and E4A student;
  • “Regenerative Agriculture: Research Updates from a Champlain Valley Farm” by Dr. Juan Alvez, UVM Extension Faculty; and
  • “Wellington Hall Academy: Elementary Agriculture and Mindful Making” by Dr. Katie Kish, E4A McGill University post-doctoral associate

Webinars are livecast via Zoom at https://zoom.us/j/900195248.  Talks are designed to be short research overviews with ideas on actionable outcomes.  Recordings will be posted at the A2E YouTube Playlist for further sharing and discussing. 

We hope to see you virtually this Wednesday at 12 noon EDT.
Jon Erickson

A Community on Ecosystem Services: Call for Proposals

ACES will be held December 14-17, 2020 at the beautiful Hyatt Regency Coconut Point in Bonita Springs, Florida.

The ACES 2020 central theme is “Focusing on the Future of Ecosystem Services” with an emphasis placed on accelerating the use of ecosystem services for land and resource management and fostering the next generation of ecosystem service researchers and practitioners.
The Program Committee is seeking input from the community and invites you to assist with program development by submitting a session or workshop proposal.
All ecosystem services related research and applications proposals are welcome; we especially encourage ideas on these topics:

  1. Ecosystem Services in Action – land and resource management using ecosystem services; case studies encouraged
  2. Human Physical and Mental Health Benefits of Ecosystem Services – translation of ecosystem function to human health outcomes and valuation; mental health studies of ecosystem services
  3. Cultural Ecosystem Services – non-use ecosystem services methods and valuation

For additional information, click here. We look forward to receiving your ideas!
Submission Deadline: February 26, 2020

2020 sustainability Travel Awards Opportunity

From the Journal Sustainability:

“We are pleased to announce that applications are open for the 2020 Sustainability Travel Awards. The awards (800 Swiss Francs each) will be granted to four PhD students or postdoctoral fellows (as of 31 December 2020) conducting research in sustainability-relevant areas (broadly defined as any discipline covered by the journal Sustainability) and go towards supporting their attendance at a conference in 2020.

We are accepting applications for these awards until 17 January 2020 .Please find additional details here.

We look forward to receiving your applications.”

Sustainability Editorial Office

St. Alban-Anlage 66

CH-4052, Basel, Switzerland

sustainability@mdpi.com

https://www.mdpi.com/journal/sustainability

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS: Climate Adaptation Research Symposium 2020, Measuring and Addressing Societal Impacts

This symposium features research that seeks to measure the scale and scope of climate impacts, as well as how best to mitigate those impacts through adaptive markets, public policies, and planning. The symposium invites research from within climate science, economics, geography, law, public health, sociology, urban planning, and related disciplines.

We invite abstract submissions to be considered by our Symposium selection committee by January 31, 2020. Abstracts should feature methods and findings and be no longer than 500 words. All travel and lodging costs for presenters will be covered.

Please upload all presentation abstracts and papers to this submission form.

Location: UCLA Luskin Conference Center, hosted by the UCLA Luskin Center for Innovation

Symposium date: Friday, May 8, 2020

Please direct questions to Michelle Einstein at meinstein@luskin.ucla.edu.

Call for Papers: UC Berkeley Climate Economics Workshop

UC Berkeley is  currently soliciting papers from PhD students and post-docs for a climate economics workshop. The deadline for submissions is 9 A.M. December 9, 2019 (Pacific time zone).
They encourage papers by PhD students and post-docs undertaking research in any area related to the economics of climate change. They encourage papers that use empirical methods, theory or numerical modelling. Papers can be single authored or co-authored. No restrictions apply to co-authors, i.e. co-authors can be senior researchers.


The workshop will explore recent advances in climate economics, with an emphasis on the linkage between empirical and numerical modeling methods. One goal of the workshop is to bring junior and senior researchers together. The final program will combine presentations from invited leading senior researchers and presentations from the most promising junior researchers (PhD students and post-docs). This is the second workshop of this kind at UC Berkeley, a summary of the previous workshop can be found at  https://matrix.berkeley.edu/research/matrix-hosts-advanced-workshop-climate-economics


Applications should be submitted online at https://forms.gle/YgXHjPisEhGmAwv19. Please include either a full working paper or an extended abstract (1-2 pages). PhD students should include a brief letter of recommendation from their advisor that indicates that the submitted abstract/paper will be ready for a full presentation for the workshop.


The workshop will be held at UC Berkeley on Fri 1/31 and Sat 2/1, 2020. All travel and lodging costs will be covered for presenters.
The workshop is organized by David Anthoff (Energy and Resources Group, UC Berkeley), Max Auffhammer (Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics, UC Berkeley) and Solomon Hsiang (Goldman School of Public Policy, UC Berkeley) in collaboration with the Social Science Matrix at UC Berkeley.


Any questions regarding the workshop should be directed to Eva Seto (evaseto@berkeley.edu).

Assistant Professor in Biological and Environmental Systems Engineering, Cornell

The Department of Biological and Environmental Engineering (BEE) at Cornell University seeks candidates for a tenure-track position.

They are especially interested in candidates who have demonstrated expertise in investigating interconnected biological and/or environmental systems and will interact widely with colleagues in our department and across the university to build an understanding of the multiple trade-offs and competing objectives that may be present at the systems nexus. 

The successful candidate will establish an innovative, high-profile research program that addresses critical problems of society today. Areas of specific interest include, but are not limited to, sustainable agriculture and/or food systems, food safety and security, and interconnected systems of food/agriculture, energy, water, and climate.

A brief summary of the position is below.

More details on the position and how to apply are available at:
https://academicjobsonline.org/ajo/jobs/14806

Webinar Recording Available: The Green New Deal: What is a reasonable “realism” in the face of an existential threat?

Presented by Eric Kemp-Benedict of the Stockholm Environment Institute (SEI) . 

On October 9th, 2019 Eric Kemp-Benedict, senior scientist at SEI and USSEE member, presented for the USSEE webinar series on the topic of the Green New Deal. You can find Eric’s webinar on the USSEE Youtube page here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jt5qF4hh9fA

Eric has also made his slides from the presentation available here

Webinar Abstract: In high-income countries, the first generation likely to be substantially impacted by climate change is coming of age, and they are urging us to action. Greta Thunberg is asking us to please panic, while Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez led the writing of the Green New Deal resolution. Their calls are grounded in appeals to “the science”: the physical mechanisms driving climate change and evidence of impacts from the natural sciences. Meanwhile, William Nordhaus was given the Nobel Memorial Prize for Economics for his work on the economics of climate change. His research program has arguably allowed for people to tell us not to panic. Yet, his has not been the only view within economics. In this presentation, I will briefly survey some of the alternatives and present a simple model for exploring broad alternatives. I will then talk about the role of social and institutional trust in making major systemic changes in a time of uncertainty.

Webinar: The Green New Deal: What is a reasonable “realism” in the face of an existential threat?

Presented by Eric Kemp-Benedict of the Stockholm Environment Institute. 
Wednesday October 9th, 1-2pm EDT

In high-income countries, the first generation likely to be substantially impacted by climate change is coming of age, and they are urging us to action. Greta Thunberg is asking us to please panic, while Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez led the writing of the Green New Deal resolution. Their calls are grounded in appeals to “the science”: the physical mechanisms driving climate change and evidence of impacts from the natural sciences. Meanwhile, William Nordhaus was given the Nobel Memorial Prize for Economics for his work on the economics of climate change. His research program has arguably allowed for people to tell us not to panic. Yet, his has not been the only view within economics. In this presentation, I will briefly survey some of the alternatives and present a simple model for exploring broad alternatives. I will then talk about the role of social and institutional trust in making major systemic changes in a time of uncertainty.

Eric Kemp-Benedict, a Senior Scientist at the Stockholm Environment Institute (SEI) and USSEE member, studies the macroeconomics of a sustainability transition. He joined SEI in 1997, where he has contributed to scenario and modeling studies on diverse topics of relevance to sustainability at national, regional, and global levels. Eric led SEI’s Rethinking Development theme during 2011 and 2012, was director of SEI’s Asia Centre from 2013 until 2016, and is a member of SEI’s Global Research Committee. He has a B.S. in physics from the University of Texas in Austin and a Ph.D. in theoretical physics from Boston University, as well as an MAT in secondary physics education from Tufts University.

To register for this free event and get login info, visit Eventbrite, or email ussee2013@gmail.com

Call for Papers: 2nd Annual NBER Environmental and Energy Policy and the Economy Conference

NBER is seeking papers or proposals for the second annual NBER conference/publication on Environmental and Energy Policy and the Economy. They will accept six papers for presentation at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. on May 21, 2020. The audience will include the professional staffs of government agencies, research institutions, and NGOs focused on energy and environmental policy. The contributed papers will then be published in an annual volume by the University of Chicago Press.

To view last year’s agenda and papers for the forthcoming volume, please click HERE and HERE.

Papers should be relevant to current policy debates in the United States and accessible to a professional audience, yet following standard NBER protocol, they should avoid making policy recommendations. While standalone projects are specifically encouraged, they also welcome spinoff projects where authors intend to later submit a more extensive or technical version to a journal, or may have already done so. While no paper should be a duplicate of another paper, alternate versions that put results into a more general, policy relevant context and summarize them in more accessible language are encouraged. This is a great opportunity to communicate research to the policy community.

Submissions should be either complete papers or 2-3 page abstracts outlining the intended contribution. Submissions are due by October 14, 2019, and can be uploaded at

http://www.nber.org/confsubmit/backend/cfp?id=EEPEs20

Submissions from researchers who are not affiliated with the NBER, and from researchers who are from groups that have been historically under-represented in the economics profession, are welcome. The authors of each paper will share an $8,000 honorarium.

Decisions about accepted papers will be made by mid-November. Complete drafts of papers will be due in early April 2019.

The conference and publication is being organized and edited by Matthew Kotchen (Yale), along with James Stock (Harvard) and Catherine Wolfram (Berkeley)