Webinars

The USSEE webinar series aims to share best practices and bring the latest research in the field of ecological economics to a broad audience. Each webinar recording is approximately one hour long, and consists of a presentation by the speaker, followed by open discussion and questions from webinar participants.

The Green New Deal: What is a Reasonable “Realism” in the Face of an Existential Threat by Eric Kemp Benedict. Presented October 9th, 2019.

In high-income countries, the first generation likely to be substantially impacted by climate change is coming of age, and they are urging us to action. Greta Thunberg is asking us to please panic, while Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez led the writing of the Green New Deal resolution. Their calls are grounded in appeals to “the science”: the physical mechanisms driving climate change and evidence of impacts from the natural sciences. Meanwhile, William Nordhaus was given the Nobel Memorial Prize for Economics for his work on the economics of climate change. His research program has arguably allowed for people to tell us not to panic. Yet, his has not been the only view within economics. In this presentation, I will briefly survey some of the alternatives and present a simple model for exploring broad alternatives. I will then talk about the role of social and institutional trust in making major systemic changes in a time of uncertainty.

Advancing the Integration of Ecosystem Services and Livelihood Adaptation by Lizzie King. Presented December 5th, 2018.

The concept of ecosystem services has become a cornerstone in dialogues and policymaking in conservation, natural resource management, and sustainable development. Most methods for ascribing values to the benefits provided by ecosystems are based on a conceptual “flow model” in which natural capital yields services, which in turn yield valued benefits to people. However, in sectors such as rural development and urban planning, there are increasingly vocal criticisms of outcomes that arise when decisions based on optimizing ecosystem services are put in to practice. In this talk, I will examine two limitations of mainstream conceptualizations of ecosystem service flows, and some methodological tools and cutting edge research from other disciplines that can help overcome those limitations. The first limitation is a failure to account for the range of capabilities that people need in order to co-create ecosystem services, and the second is a failure to formally consider how the benefits and values are distributed among members and segments of society. Principles from Sustainable Livelihood Analysis and the nascent field of adaptation studies can complement ecosystem service analyses and valuations to give more holistic and realistic understandings of ecosystem service flows and who benefits from them.

Maryland’s Experience in Measuring Genuine Progress by Anders Hayden. Presented August 18th, 2018.

The Genuine Progress Indicator (GPI) is intended to provide a more comprehensive picture of wellbeing than Gross Domestic Product (GDP) by including monetary estimates for a range of environmental, social, and economic costs and benefits ignored in GDP calculations. Beginning in 2010, Maryland has adopted the GPI as an additional indicator of wellbeing for their state. This webinar will provide a look at how Maryland’s use of the GPI has impacted state policy and public priorities. The talk will also provide some preliminary findings from the speakers’s more recent work in investigating use of the GPI in the state of Vermont.

Valuing Ecosystem Services in the Mississippi River Basin by Tania Briceno. Presented June 20th, 2018

Tania Briceno of Earth Economics will present a framewpork for identifying, quantifying, and valuing ecosystem services associated with water and adjacent ecosystems; including important watershed attributes that result in different types of ecosystem seArvice values.

Ecological Economics of Global Climate Change by Jim Kahn. Presented April 18th, 2018.

What will global climate change do to the world economy? This talk does not present a series of cost and damage estimates, but examines the economics of climate change in conceptual terms. The initial focus is on the urgency of limiting emissions quickly, focusing on the tight schedule involved in freezing atmospheric emissions at a level below 500ppm. The world needs to quickly limit annual emissions to 1960s levels if it has any hope of avoiding catastrophic climate change. Classes of damages are discussed, such as health impacts, environmental refugees, coastal damage and impacts on resource dependent communities in developing nations The talk concludes by focusing on new technology and how intelligent policies, such as carbon taxes, alternative energy subsidies, and changes in land use can have the potential to drastically slow emissions.

Incorporating Ecological Economics into a Standard Economics Course by John Gowdy. Presented February 28th, 2018.

Those of us who teach a standard course in environmental economics are obligated to cover the basic tools of economic analysis and show how these tools are applied to environmental issues. These include marginal analysis, discounting, competitive equilibrium and market failure. But the limitations of neoclassical analysis as applied to the major global environmental issues we face, biodiversity loss and climate change, are becoming increasingly obvious. This webinar discusses what ecological economics can bring to the table in a standard economics course.

Transforming the Economy for a Just and Sustainable World