Call for Board Member Nominations

Dear USSEE Community,

The USSEE Board of Directors invites you to nominate candidate(s) for the Board of the U.S. Society for Ecological Economics. The election will be held in late May and we are seeking nominations for the following positions by May 10th. You are welcome to self-nominate.

Nominations are for the following 5 positions with terms beginning June 1st, 2019:

·  Secretary Treasurer

·  Board Members at Large (2 members)

·  Graduate Student Member

·  Undergraduate Student Member

The Undergraduate Student Member Position is a new position that we hope to fill for the first time this year. Candidates for student representative must be an active student member of the society (requiring the individual to be enrolled at least half time at an institution of higher education) and have a desire to be engaged in the field of ecological economics and help USSEE fulfill our purposes, which include: the advancement of understanding of the relationships between ecological systems and economic systems, and the application of this understanding to the mutual well-being of nature and people, especially that of the most vulnerable, now and in the future. The representative will serve as a voice for the undergraduate student perspective on the board of directors, helping us to better train, reach, and retain the next generation of ecological economists. We see the role of the student representative to help USSEE connect with students across our regional networks and bring those topics to the board for consideration, as well as help the Society to expand our reach to students engaged in the study and practice of ecological economics.  Activities and initiatives could include helping to organize student research highlights on the blog, coordinating student events on ecological economics at different universities, and hosting networking events for students at biennial conferences. Please help us in circulating this notice among your student networks or suggesting outstanding students for this position.

Names or inquiries for all positions can be submitted to ussee2013@gmail.com.

Thank you in advance for your consideration and suggestions,

The USSEE Board of Directors

Position Announcement: University of New Hampshire Lecturer in environmental conservation and SUSTAINABILITY

The Department of Natural Resources and the Environment at the University of New Hampshire invites applications for a full-time (.88 FTE – academic-year, 9-month), benefits-eligible, three-year (renewable), non-tenure-track Lecturer position to begin fall term August 2019. UNH Lecturer Faculty are represented by the AAUP through a collective bargaining agreement. UNH is committed to social justice and actively creates an educational environment that fosters diversity, inclusion, and quality engagement for all.

We seek a skilled and passionate teacher and mentor to offer undergraduate courses and support the vibrant Environmental Conservation and Sustainability (ECS) Program. This lecturer will be primarily responsible for undergraduate teaching in ECS, and will also engage in on-campus and/or off-campus service responsibilities, including academic advising of undergraduates in the Department of Natural Resources and the Environment. The initial course load will include Principles of Sustainability, Sustainable Living – Global Perspectives, and Systems Thinking for Sustainable Solutions. Continued employment beyond the initial three-year appointment is contingent on satisfactory performance and program needs.

The University of New Hampshire is an R1 research institution that provides high-quality undergraduate and graduate programs of distinction. Located on a 188-acre campus in Durham, UNH (https://www.unh.edu/main/about-unh) thrives in a dynamic and beautiful part of New England. Approximately one hour from both Boston and Portland, Durham is also conveniently close to the Atlantic Ocean, the White Mountains, and New Hampshire’s Lake Region.

The UNH Department of Natural Resources comprises six academic programs, including ECS, and offers six majors and more than ten minors. The Environmental Conservation and Sustainability Program makes up approximately 130 of the 439 undergraduates in the Department of Natural Resources and the Environment (https://colsa.unh.edu/natural-resources-environment/program/bs/environmental-conservation-sustainability-major). Questions regarding this position can be directed to Clay Mitchell, Chair of the Search Committee (Clayton.Mitchell@unh.edu).


Qualifications

Minimum qualifications include a Ph.D. in natural resources, environmental studies, or a related field, and prior post-secondary teaching experience with demonstrated potential for excellence in teaching. Proficiency with current academic technology is highly desirable.


Application Procedures and Deadline


The application can be completed at https://jobs.usnh.edu/, and includes a cover letter, CV/resume, Statement of Teaching Philosophy, student evaluations of prior teaching, and names and contact information of three references. Applicants may also submit optional scholarly documents in support of their application. Letters of reference will be required before initial interviews. Review of applications will begin on March 29, 2019, and the position will remain open until filled.


The University of New Hampshire is an Equal Opportunity/Equal Access/Affirmative Action institution. The University seeks excellence through diversity among its administrators, faculty, staff, and students. The university prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, disability, veteran status, or marital status. Successful applicants will be able to demonstrate a commitment to diversity and inclusive excellence. Application by members of all underrepresented groups is encouraged. ​

USSEE @ SEA 2019: Call for papers

The United States Society for Ecological Economics (USSEE) will organize sessions in ecological economics at the 89th annual meeting of the Southern Economic Association (SEA), to be held in Fort Lauderdale, FL at the Fort Lauderdale Marriott Harbor Beach Resort & Spa, November 23-25, 2019 (Saturday to Monday) (www.southerneconomic.org/conference/). We are seeking 8 to 12 papers to organize two to three USSEE@SEA sessions in ecological economics. Proposals for full sessions as well as individual presentations will be considered. Please send the abstracts or complete sessions to Robert Richardson (rbr@msu.eduby April 10, 2019, and we will organize the USSEE sessions and submit directly to the SEA. Please list all authors and full contact information for each author on the abstract page.

Feel free to contact Robert Richardson at rbr@msu.edu with any questions.

Call for Nominations: Herman Daly Award and Bernardo Aguilar Award

The USSEE Board of Directors is soliciting nominees for two awards (the Herman Daly Award and Bernardo Aguilar Award) to be given in conjunction with the 2019 ESA & USSEE Joint Meeting, to be held August 11th-16th in Louisville, Kentucky.

The deadline for nominations is May 1st. Details on award criteria and submissions are below:

  • The Herman Daly Award, was established in 2003 in honor of one of the visionaries and founders of ecological economics, Herman Daly. The award is designed to recognize outstanding contributions to the field, and acknowledges individuals who have connected ecological economic thinking to practical applications and solutions that are sustainable in scale, equitable in distribution, and efficient in allocation. The award criteria include the following:
    • made visionary contributions to the field of ecological economics
    • connected ecological economic thinking to practical applications
    • created conceptual frameworks and practical solutions to sustainability challenges
    • identified policies and processes that  advance social and environmental sustainability
    • advanced the recognition of scale as an essential part of sustainability
    • advanced distributive justice and social consciousness as an essential part of sustainability
    • contributed to conservation and the just allocation of resources

A list of past Daly Award winners can be found at
http://www.ussee.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/Past-Herman-Daly-Award-Winners.pdf

Please send nominations to ussee2013@gmail.com by May 1st. Nominations should include the name, affiliation and contact information of your nominee, and a brief statement describing the nominee’s qualifications for the Herman Daly Award. The Board will review all nominations and select the recipient.

  • The Bernardo Aguilar Award, was established in 2007 and is given to a person nominated and selected by students. The award was created to recognize a professional who has inspired students through teaching, research, ideas, and/or mentoring in ecological economics.

Please circulate to students! Students can submit nominations to ussee2013@gmail.com by May 1st. Nominations should include the name, affiliation and contact information of your nominee, and a brief statement describing the nominee’s qualifications for the Bernardo Aguilar Award. The Board will compile the nominations and call for a student vote to select the award winner.

February webinar: Gross Domestic Welfare: Comprehensively Measuring Income

Wednesday February 27th, 1pm EST.

Gross Domestic Welfare: Comprehensively Measuring Income, with pilot accounts for the U.S. and California.

Presented by Eli Lazarus, PhD student, UC Berkeley Energy and Resources Group 

In order to better understand, track and optimize welfare, we need assessments of comprehensive welfare. Various initiatives attempt this; from GDP and other standard national accounts, to the Genuine Progress Indicator (GPI), metrics like the U.N. Development Program’s Human Development Index, the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs’ Sustainable Development Goals, and Bhutan’s Gross Happiness Index. Gross Domestic Welfare (GDW) attempts to fill a gap in this research and these projects. GDW builds from the Genuine Progress Indicator, and from efforts to assess the full welfare contribution of ecosystem services and other non-market elements such as leisure. Elements that contribute to human welfare are incorporated as comprehensively as possible, valued in currency terms as a common unit, with shadow prices from valuation research where necessary. GDW differs from GPI in removing: historical and regional benchmarks; the boundary of impacts of the industrial economy; and a ‘standard’ and limited set of elements.

Initial pilot accounts are being built assessing California and the United States over the period 1995 to 2016. I will present these initial results, comparing them to GSP/GDP, and GPI accounts for CA and the US recently completed for the same period. I will present the framework, theory, and methods of Gross Domestic Welfare, and look forward to a robust discussion, including limitations, challenges, and priority steps forward.

To Register, email ussee2013@gmail.com, or visit Evenetbrite at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/ussee-webinar-gross-domestic-welfare-comprehensively-measuring-income-tickets-55840319900

Lecturer in Human-Environment Systems and Data Literacy

University of Georgia: Odum School of Ecology

The Odum School of Ecology at the University of Georgia invites applications for one Lecturer (non-tenure track) with a focus in coupled human-environment systems and data literacy.  We seek a discipline-bridging scholar who will play a fundamental role in training students to understand, analyze, and visualize information, including geospatial information, using a variety of data sources from natural sciences and one or more complementary perspectives.  Potential areas of emphasis include ecosystem services, sustainability science, food energy or water systems, and interdisciplinary perspectives on global change; from ecological and complementary perspectives such as economics, engineering, or quantitative and qualitative social sciences.

The ideal candidate will bring new skills and theoretical perspectives to the Odum School, and will demonstrate a passion for undergraduate education and building programmatic excellence in data literacy training.  We seek candidates with an aptitude for mentoring students interested in traditional ecological science careers (through the B.S. degree program) or careers focused in translation or integration of ecological science with policy, management, communications, or other disciplines (via the A.B. degree program).  An interest in leading service learning classes would also be valued.   The Odum School is dedicated to supporting and enhancing diversity and inclusiveness, and strongly encourages applications from candidates who will enrich that mission.

We especially encourage applications from candidates who have: 

Expertise in coupled human-environment systems

Expertise in discipline-spanning scholarship

Expertise in data analysis and visualization

Expertise in geospatial information

Aptitude for undergraduate instruction and mentorship

Aptitude for providing data literacy training

Commitment to enhancing diversity and inclusivity

The position is a 12-month full-time appointment. Responsibilities are primarily instructional, with opportunity for research.  The position offers diverse instructional opportunities including lecture, lab, and field courses, and directed undergraduate study and research.  In addition to developing a spatial data course and other potential courses in their area of expertise, the scholar will contribute to current course offerings through instruction and by developing new data literacy and visualization components.  The scholar will also contribute to undergraduate mentoring and research supervision as part of their responsibilities. 

To apply, candidates must have a PhD in ecology or relevant field.   To receive full consideration applications should be received by 27 February, 2019.  

To apply for the position, candidates should electronically submit the following materials http://www.ugajobsearch.com/postings/59673

1) Cover letter, including research interests and suitability for the position.

2) Curriculum vitae.

3) 2-page Teaching statement, including vision for enhancing data literacy.

4) 1-page Diversity statement, explaining experience, professional skills, and vision that would enhance diversity and inclusivity (using Other Documents#1).

5) Contact information for three professional referees who may submit letters of recommendation

Official transcripts will be requested from finalists.  Questions regarding the position can be directed to search committee chair, Dr. Elizabeth King, egking@uga.edu.

The University of Georgia is located in Athens, Georgia. Georgia is well known for its quality of life with both outdoor and urban activities (www.georgia.gov). UGA (www.uga.edu) is a land grant/sea grant institution located approximately 60 miles northeast of Atlanta. It is within an hour driving distance from the North Georgia Mountains and four hours from the Atlantic coast. Athens enjoys a mild climate and yet still sees the benefits of the changing seasons. It is well known for its vibrant and evolving music scene, serving as the hometown of bands such as R.E.M., the B-52’s, Widespread Panic, the Drive-By Truckers, of Montreal, and Futurebirds. 

The University of Georgia is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, ethnicity, age, genetic information, disability, gender identity, sexual orientation or protected veteran status.  Persons needing accommodations or assistance with the accessibility of materials related to this search are encouraged to contact Central HR (hrweb@uga.edu). Please do not contact the department or search committee with such requests.

December 5th Webinar: Advancing the Integration of Ecosystem Services and Livelihood Adaptation

Presented by Dr. Elizabeth G King

Wednesday December 5th, 1pm EST
The concept of ecosystem services has become a cornerstone in dialogues and policymaking in conservation, natural resource management, and sustainable development. Most methods for ascribing values to the benefits provided by ecosystems are based on a conceptual “flow model” in which natural capital yields services, which in turn yield valued benefits to people. However, in sectors such as rural development and urban planning, there are increasingly vocal criticisms of outcomes that arise when decisions based on optimizing ecosystem services are put in to practice. In this talk, I will examine two limitations of mainstream conceptualizations of ecosystem service flows, and some methodological tools and cutting edge research from other disciplines that can help overcome those limitations. The first limitation is a failure to account for the range of capabilities that people need in order to co-create ecosystem services, and the second is a failure to formally consider how the benefits and values are distributed among members and segments of society. Principles from Sustainable Livelihood Analysis and the nascent field of adaptation studies can complement ecosystem service analyses and valuations to give more holistic and realistic understandings of ecosystem service flows and who benefits from them.

To register for this free event, use the eventbrite link here, or email ussee2013@gmail.com

Gund Institute creates Eric Zencey Prize in Ecological Economics

Prize to celebrate best writing on planet’s environmental limits

The Gund Institute for Environment at the University of Vermont is pleased to announce the creation of the Eric Zencey Prize in Ecological Economics to celebrate the best writing on the environmental limits of our finite planet.

The prize is supported by a growing endowment, established with generous contributions by family, friends and colleagues of Zencey, a pioneering scholar in ecological economics, a field that explores the relationships between economics and our planet’s limited natural resources.

[Friends and colleagues seeking to support the Eric Zencey Prize can make donations and pledges online.]

“My sincere hope is that this Prize will help nudge our civilization onto a better path—one that arrives purposefully at an ecologically sustainable relationship between society and nature,” says Eric Zencey. “It’s important to me that the ideas we foster here in the Academy get to work in the world.  I hope this prize will inspire future generations of environmental writers and ecological economists to communicate real-world solutions beyond ‘the Ivory Tower.’”

Valued at $4,000 USD, the Eric Zencey Prize will be awarded every two years to the best English-language current affairs book or work of long-form journalism that advances public understanding of ecological economics’ principles by using them as an explanatory lens on current affairs. The Gund Institute and the United States Society for Ecological Economics (USSEE) will partner to solicit nominations and select the inaugural recipient by 2020.

“This is an excellent legacy for Eric, and an important new prize for the field of Ecological Economics,” says Taylor Ricketts, Director, Gund Institute for Environment. “We thank the Zencey family for their vision and generosity.”

Learn more or give to the Eric Zencey Prize for Ecological Economics. Share this announcement online. Learn about Gund efforts in Ecological Economics, including funded PhD opportunities.

BACKGROUND

Born in Delaware, and holding a PhD in political philosophy and the history of science, Zencey is a writer, teacher, and public intellectual. At the University of Vermont and Washington University of St. Louis, Zencey has worked to bring ecological economics outside the academy to understand and address the political, economic, social, and environmental challenges facing society.

Zencey is author of four books, including The Other Road to Serfdom and the Path to Sustainable Democracy and (with Elizabeth Courtney) Greening Vermont: Towards a Sustainable State. His first book was the internationally best-selling novel and New York Times Notable Book of the Year, Panama. His writing has appeared in media outlets ranging from The New York Times and Chronicle of Higher Education to Adbusters. He has been a featured contributor to The Daly News, which honors the work of steady-state economist Herman Daly. Zencey has received Fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the Rockefeller-Bellagio Foundation and the Bogliasco Foundation.

In Vermont and Missouri, Zencey has been a pioneer in the compilation of and advocacy for the Genuine Progress Indicator (GPI), a more comprehensive measure of economic, social and environmental health than GDP. His efforts led to Vermont becoming one of the first states in the nation to adopt GPI measurement.

Zencey’s affiliations at UVM include the Gund Institute, the Political Science Dept., the Honors College, the Center for Research on Vermont, and the Center for Rural Studies. At Washington University, his appointments include teaching and research positions in the College of Architecture and Urban Planning at the Sam Fox School for Design and Visual Art.

ABOUT THE GUND INSTITUTE

The Gund Institute for Environment catalyzes environmental research, develops real-world solutions to global issues, and connects with leaders in government, business and beyond. Based at the University of Vermont, the Institute has 150 faculty, global affiliates, graduate students and post-docs who focus on environmental issues at the interface of four pressing themes: climate solutions, health and well-being, sustainable agriculture, and resilient communities.

Transforming the Economy for a Just and Sustainable World